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In Another Room, from Another Time

Songbook

In Another Room, from Another Time

In Hirokazu Kore-eda’s Still Walking, the briefly heard Japanese pop hit that inspired the film’s title is both a portal to long-buried memories and a minor detail that resists interpretation.

By Ben Elias

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Long Live the Microcinema
Long Live the Microcinema

With the future of film exhibition more uncertain than ever, several small-scale organizations with highly personal curation are proving they have what it takes to survive against the odds.

By Nicolas Rapold

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In Case You Missed Them: A Year’s Worth of Essential Reading on the Current
In Case You Missed Them: A Year’s Worth of Essential Reading on the Current

Before ringing in the new year, we’re taking a look back at some of the most memorable essays and interviews we published in 2020.

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The Self-Created Immortality of Mae West
The Self-Created Immortality of Mae West

With her contralto drawl, genius for innuendo, and fierce control behind the camera, this great Hollywood provocateur pioneered a sex-positive cinema far ahead of its time.

By Farran Smith Nehme

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Movie Dates

First Person

Movie Dates

Cinematic and carnal ravishment are sometimes at cross-purposes, as this celebrated American essayist discovered after many fumbled attempts at merging the two.

By Phillip Lopate

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Bengali First: The Fierce Commitments of Soumitra Chatterjee
Bengali First: The Fierce Commitments of Soumitra Chatterjee

The esteemed actor, who died in November, was far more than the face of Satyajit Ray’s cinema. Always, though, he maintained an unwavering devotion to his roots in Bengal.

By Mayukh Sen

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Queer Fear: Dorian the Devil
Queer Fear: Dorian the Devil

In Albert Lewin’s cagey adaptation of The Picture of Dorian Gray, homosexuality is viewed as it was in much of classical Hollywood cinema: as an eerie monstrosity.

By Michael Koresky

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Train Ride to Hell: A Shocking Encounter in Code Unknown

One Scene

Train Ride to Hell: A Shocking Encounter in Code Unknown

The director of Martha Marcy May Marlene and The Nest examines the violence and unexpected humanism in one of Michael Haneke’s most unnerving long takes.

By Sean Durkin

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The Deaths and Rebirths of Chris Marker’s CD-ROM Immemory
The Deaths and Rebirths of Chris Marker’s CD-ROM Immemory

One of the French auteur’s most immersive art projects finds itself on the brink of format obsolescence, as Acrobat plans to phase out Flash software at the end of the year.

By Isabel Ochoa Gold

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An Anguish at Arm’s Length: Supriya Choudhury in The Cloud-Capped Star

Performances

An Anguish at Arm’s Length: Supriya Choudhury in The Cloud-Capped Star

The legendary Bengali actor worked within and against conventions of melodrama to embody the pain of a woman destroyed by her own selflessness.

By Devika Girish

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This Side of
This Side of Parasite: New Korean Cinema 1998–2009

In the wake of Bong Joon Ho’s internationally beloved hit, a new Criterion Channel series looks back at the explosion of Korean filmmaking that began at the turn of the millennium.

By Ed Lin

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How Curtis Mayfield and Gladys Knight Created a Sound for Working-Class Black America
How Curtis Mayfield and Gladys Knight Created a Sound for Working-Class Black America

The deeply introspective music in Claudine brings layers of emotional authenticity and nuance to a portrait of Black love and family.

By Mark Anthony Neal

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Marlon Riggs, Ancestor
Marlon Riggs, Ancestor

A Pulitzer Prize–winning poet pays tribute to the liberating power of the pioneering filmmaker and his truth-telling body of work.

By Jericho Brown

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A Writer’s Retreat

First Person

A Writer’s Retreat

In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, a New York writer recalls the pure, easy pleasures of the multiplex and the feeling of escape at the heart of moviegoing.

By Sloane Crosley

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Fassbinder and Kraftwerk: A Marriage Made in a New Germany

Songbook

Fassbinder and Kraftwerk: A Marriage Made in a New Germany

The iconic band’s 1976 song “Radio-Activity” finds a perfect home in the final episode of Berlin Alexanderplatz, providing a musical correlative to the film’s interrogation of national identity.

By Violet Lucca

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The Meaning of Money in The Game

One Scene

The Meaning of Money in The Game

A rich investment banker obliviously meets a moment of reckoning in David Fincher’s intricately plotted thriller.

By Gina Telaroli

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Restoration as Reimagining History

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 3

Restoration as Reimagining History

The efforts of The Film Foundation’s World Cinema Project have served as a powerful vehicle for reconfiguring the history of the art form in critical and expansive ways.

By Cecilia Cenciarelli

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Empty Theaters

First Person

Empty Theaters

The author of The Fortress of Solitude considers the meditative, “brain-rinsing” effects of the solo moviegoing experience.

By Jonathan Lethem

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Laughs That Hurt: Albert Brooks’s Uncomfortable Comedies
Laughs That Hurt: Albert Brooks’s Uncomfortable Comedies

Anxiety, panic, and chronic ambivalence course through the hilarious films of one of America’s most influential comedic voices.

By Ari Aster

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The Money Pit: Uttam Kumar in The Hero

Performances

The Money Pit: Uttam Kumar in The Hero

In the first of his two collaborations with Satyajit Ray, the Bengali superstar did not just rely on his image, he enriched it with a unique blend of charisma and craft.

By Mayukh Sen

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Plymptopia
Plymptopia

Childishly anarchic in worldview and distinctly analog in look, the animated films of Bill Plympton are a testament to the pleasures of painstaking craftsmanship.

By Michael Atkinson

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Subvert Normality: The Streetwise Voice of Linda Manz
Subvert Normality: The Streetwise Voice of Linda Manz

The beloved actor, who passed away earlier this month, brought a live-wire sensibility and a genius for improvisation to a small but potent filmography.

By Rebecca Bengal

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The Black Artist Hollywood Couldn’t Buy
The Black Artist Hollywood Couldn’t Buy

One of indie visionary Bill Gunn’s creative partners looks back on the struggles they faced in a racist movie industry and the making of their long-neglected masterpiece Personal Problems.

By Ishmael Reed

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Masaki Kobayashi Plays Hardball

Deep Dives

Masaki Kobayashi Plays Hardball

A noirish tale of closed-door dealings and systemic corruption, I Will Buy You is the anti-sports movie that feels most like baseball in 2020.

By Mark Asch

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